History of Dental Implants
Today, implantation is perhaps the most advanced method of replacing lost teeth. In any case, this will be so until every person can afford a means for self-healing of teeth,…

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History of Dental Implants

Today, implantation is perhaps the most advanced method of replacing lost teeth. In any case, this will be so until every person can afford a means for self-healing of teeth, the achievements of which are currently already present in those or other variations.

But up to this point – as it is. Comparing today’s techniques with the first attempts of mankind in this area, we can definitely say that implantation made a leap forward and continues to progress to this day. Its history is no less rich than the history of toothpaste, or toothbrush (which you can also read on our website if you haven’t done it yet), although there are not so many documented cases of its most striking manifestations. Nevertheless, the material for you was collected interesting and you can familiarize yourself with it by clicking on this link: …

A brief history of BC

The very first references to the procedure, vaguely reminiscent of modern implantation, send us to Ancient China, 2000 years before our era. Missing teeth were replaced mainly with bamboo pegs and wood.

The first use of metal in replacing lost teeth was documented 1,000 years BC. in ancient Egypt. In the upper jaw bone of the then pharaoh, a copper insert was found, hammered in place of one of the teeth.

It is worth mentioning that not so long ago in France, in a Celtic grave, in one of the skulls, about 2300 years old, an iron tooth was found, which was cluttered among natural ones. It is fair to say that there is debate about the veracity of the last find.

However, one way or another, but scientists are more inclined to believe that during the time of the above finds, the replacement took place, rather, after the death of the “patient”, as part of the funeral action. It is unlikely that anyone would voluntarily go on to force foreign bodies into his jaw roughly. Even if someone had endured such torture – despite ignorance in many issues, but people understood that such would entail terrible consequences for a living person, up to the change of his status to “dead”.

Implantation of “AD”

2000 years ago, the teeth of animals (a heteroplastic implant), or even the teeth of people from a lower caste (a homoplastic implant) were inserted into living and wealthy people. Naturally, such implants could only save a miracle from rejection, and a person from painful death due to infection.

About 1350 years ago, a much greater variety of materials used in tooth replacement already reigned. This is evidenced by skulls found by archaeologists of approximately the same age, in which there was a real variety of implants: from jade inserts to inserts from sea shells. In rare cases, as it was found out, the implants even took root. It would be appropriate to immediately recall the expedition to the Mayan ruins, in Honduras, where Dr. Dorothy Wilson unveiled a unique find: a jaw with three shell-shaped tooth-shaped shells. Around the two of them, which were inserted neatly, the bone structure had pronounced signs of regeneration, but the third was driven in, presumably by the woman, already posthumously.

At least some significant progress in the field began to take place starting from the 19th century. In 1809, doctor Magilio first applied gold, which was picked up by other bright minds who began to experiment with metal alloys. Despite the fact that this required significant efforts – the results, as a rule, were frankly poor.

In 1886, attempts were made to use a platinum crown mounted on a platinum base. From a long-term perspective, the results were again unsatisfactory. Over time, the implant has always been rejected by the body. The success of implantation is to ensure that the structure really engrafted into the bone. Today we call it osseointegration.

Based on this, modern dental implants are made mostly of titanium, because, due to its properties, its use provides a high degree of success in osseointegration. This was revealed back in 1952 by an orthopedic surgeon – Per-Ingvar Brainmark. And quite by accident. In the process of studying the treatment and regeneration of bone, Brainmark inserted a titanium cylinder into the thigh of a rabbit, and after a while realized that he could not extract it as easily and simply. Then he realized that the bone had grown so close to the cylinder that he had taken root in the rabbit’s body. Shocked by the discovery, he continued to experiment on both animals and humans in order to install his first titanium implant in 1965 for a living person who volunteered. This was a turning point in the history of implantation, which set the direction for its development, which we follow to this day.

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